jekyllskitchen:

kill-dorothy:

I think this video might interest you guys.

4 days ago, Olivia Olson confirmed that Marceline and Bonnibel have dated before. The reason it has been confirmed is because the new Adventure Time book coming out soon may have details on their relationship, and their relationship obviously can’t be aired on TV because some states of America (and countries in the world) are against same-sex marriage and relationships. 

But yeah, they have indeed dated before.

IT’S CANON!!!!!!!!

(Source: lil-human-cal)

64,940 notes

I think the saddest people always try their hardest to make people happy

because they know what it’s like to feel absolutely worthless

and they don’t want anyone else to feel like that.

Robin Williams (via faerie-floss)

(Source: skateeofmind)

254,540 notes

I crave touch, yet I flinch every time someone is close enough.
I have become rather fearful I suppose.  (via dollpoetry)

89,141 notes

motiveweight:

watchnthescalegodown
It’s My Birthday So Happy Birthday to me!!! 1 years difference! I made a commitment to myself last year to get back to the place where I felt comfortable in my own skin and I’m happy to say that not only have I done that, I’ve done more! I changed my entire lifestyle and couldn’t be prouder with myself . 
5’7 
before:180ish
After 130ish

motiveweight:

It’s My Birthday So Happy Birthday to me!!! 1 years difference! I made a commitment to myself last year to get back to the place where I felt comfortable in my own skin and I’m happy to say that not only have I done that, I’ve done more! I changed my entire lifestyle and couldn’t be prouder with myself . 

5’7 

before:180ish

After 130ish

745 notes

motiveweight:

pe-poni
Hi everyone!! As a young teen, I was always overweight. The first picture was taken a little bit after i moved to the US from Jamaica. In Jamaica, i was healthy and fit. But, when i came back I gained a lot of weight in the first month. Junk food, sitting home, etc etc. I finally decided to eat healthy and workout like I did while in Jamaica. I was around 13 in the first picture at about 220 pounds. I am now 16 and at 174 pounds as of this morning. My goal weight is 130 pounds and i hope to make it by my birthday next year ❤❤ I absolutely cannot believe the difference it has made in my life. 

motiveweight:

pe-poni

Hi everyone!! As a young teen, I was always overweight. The first picture was taken a little bit after i moved to the US from Jamaica. In Jamaica, i was healthy and fit. But, when i came back I gained a lot of weight in the first month. Junk food, sitting home, etc etc. I finally decided to eat healthy and workout like I did while in Jamaica. I was around 13 in the first picture at about 220 pounds. I am now 16 and at 174 pounds as of this morning. My goal weight is 130 pounds and i hope to make it by my birthday next year ❤❤ I absolutely cannot believe the difference it has made in my life. 

171 notes

healthfitnessfoodhumour:

1. Over Training
It can be easy to just want to go day after day, working out for hours and squeezing it any workout you can whenever. Doing too much does not allow your body enough time to recover. When you push it too hard you tend to feel tired and your body craves lots of carbs and sugar because it needs the energy. Consider a two-day-on, one-day-off routine to allow for better recovery, and instead of boot camp with weight training and cardio all in a single day, try breaking them up and performing those routines on separate days.
2. Not Getting Enough Zzzzzzs
We are constantly moving during the day so night time when we sleep is the time our bodies have to repair itself from the muscles we’ve used and torn during workouts and daily activities. Also, sleep deprivation tends to suppress our natural growth hormone, making it harder to build lean muscle. Lack os sleep also makes us tired and thus nit having enough energy to workout.
3. Just Doing Cardio
It sure would be nice if we could simply hit the pavement day after day, log a few miles and end up with the perky derrière that we’ve always dreamed of. The sad truth is that without a combination of cardio and strength training, we will never win the war with gravity and manage to lift and tone everything. If you have been avoiding weights due to a fear of bulking up, you can rest easy knowing that it’s not that easy! A seriously muscled physique takes years of training and consuming loads of calories. Look at it this way, cardio burns the fat and strength training shapes/tone up the body. Do cardio and you will end up with saggy skin and we don’t want that now do we?
4. Overestimating the Caloric Burn
Many people rely on exercise equipment to determine the calories burned and those machines are often generalized and inaccurate. Your best bet is to keep a food journal and log every morsel that passes your lips. Without getting your nutrition in check, you could exercise until you are blue (or in this case, red) in the face and the only result would be frustration.
5. A Stale Workout Routine
A routine is comforting but when it comes to a workout, if you have been doing the same routine month after month, your body has likely adapted to the stimulus and is simply going through the motions. You need to shake things up and introduce new stimuli in order to keep making progress. Our bodies only change when they are forced to adapt. Consider trying a new workout at least every 3 to 4 weeks.
6.Going Too Easy
So don’t make the mistake of going too easy in the gym, ladies! Muscles only grow when they are forced to do work. Never sacrifice form to lift heavier weight but don’t let heavier weight intimidate you. Try lifting a slightly heavier weight for a repetition or two and then drop down in weight to finish the set. Then each time try a little bit more. When doing cardio, instead of long sessions of steady-state cardio, try incorporating active rests between sets or high intensity sessions like 30 second sprints (30 seconds of hard work and 30 seconds rest) to really kick up the intensity. Push but don’t push too hard.
7. Not Enough Calories
Food is fuel, not the enemy. So many people make the mistake of cutting calories too low when trying to get in shape. Without adequate fuel you’ll be hard-pressed to build muscle, and it’s the muscle that raises your metabolism. Constantly under-eating creates a vicious cycle as the metabolism slows down to preserve the energy it’s not getting from food. This then stalls weight loss (or creates weight gain) which causes many people to increase cardio and cut even more calories. Determine the calories you need, taking into consideration your activity level (including exercise) and keep a food log to stay on track.
8. Too Many Cheat Meals
A dangling carrot can certainly be great motivation for your workouts but when that “carrot” becomes the occasional cinnamon roll, alcoholic beverage or seven layer chocolate cake, it’s a potential slippery slope. An indulgence for a special occasion is certainly OK and even encouraged to maintain sanity. Also, having a bite of something sinful every now and then won’t reverse all of the good you’ve done, but be cautious of a weekly cheat meal. The cleaner the fuel (food) in your body, the leaner you’ll be.
9. Stress and Hormones
At times of stress it’s not uncommon for people to turn to food whether it’s eating to fill an emotional need, or eating on the run because there never seems to be enough time in the day.  But a stressed-out lifestyle can lead to weight gain and hinder your workouts. If your workouts seem less productive and you often combat cravings, consider finding methods to reduce stress in your life.
10. Lack of Consistency
All too often people start an exercise program with the best of intentions, scheduling themselves for 5 days a week. Don’t set yourself up for failure right out of the gate. Before engaging in a regular workout routine, determine a realistic number of days that you will be able to commit to without fail. Consistency is paramount to your fitness success. Catching a workout now and then is good for your overall health but for those looking to make noticeable change, it’s going to take a regular routine and solid commitment. If you can only go 3 days a week, be sure to hit every muscle group within those 3 days with enough intensity and stay active the other days. Any amount of exercise is always encouraged, but it’s those who consider it training and not just a workout who typically achieve greater success.
(Source)

healthfitnessfoodhumour:

1. Over Training

It can be easy to just want to go day after day, working out for hours and squeezing it any workout you can whenever. Doing too much does not allow your body enough time to recover. When you push it too hard you tend to feel tired and your body craves lots of carbs and sugar because it needs the energy. Consider a two-day-on, one-day-off routine to allow for better recovery, and instead of boot camp with weight training and cardio all in a single day, try breaking them up and performing those routines on separate days.

2. Not Getting Enough Zzzzzzs

We are constantly moving during the day so night time when we sleep is the time our bodies have to repair itself from the muscles we’ve used and torn during workouts and daily activities. Also, sleep deprivation tends to suppress our natural growth hormone, making it harder to build lean muscle. Lack os sleep also makes us tired and thus nit having enough energy to workout.

3. Just Doing Cardio

It sure would be nice if we could simply hit the pavement day after day, log a few miles and end up with the perky derrière that we’ve always dreamed of. The sad truth is that without a combination of cardio and strength training, we will never win the war with gravity and manage to lift and tone everything. If you have been avoiding weights due to a fear of bulking up, you can rest easy knowing that it’s not that easy! A seriously muscled physique takes years of training and consuming loads of calories. Look at it this way, cardio burns the fat and strength training shapes/tone up the body. Do cardio and you will end up with saggy skin and we don’t want that now do we?

4. Overestimating the Caloric Burn

Many people rely on exercise equipment to determine the calories burned and those machines are often generalized and inaccurate. Your best bet is to keep a food journal and log every morsel that passes your lips. Without getting your nutrition in check, you could exercise until you are blue (or in this case, red) in the face and the only result would be frustration.

5. A Stale Workout Routine

A routine is comforting but when it comes to a workout, if you have been doing the same routine month after month, your body has likely adapted to the stimulus and is simply going through the motions. You need to shake things up and introduce new stimuli in order to keep making progress. Our bodies only change when they are forced to adapt. Consider trying a new workout at least every 3 to 4 weeks.

6.Going Too Easy

So don’t make the mistake of going too easy in the gym, ladies! Muscles only grow when they are forced to do work. Never sacrifice form to lift heavier weight but don’t let heavier weight intimidate you. Try lifting a slightly heavier weight for a repetition or two and then drop down in weight to finish the set. Then each time try a little bit more. When doing cardio, instead of long sessions of steady-state cardio, try incorporating active rests between sets or high intensity sessions like 30 second sprints (30 seconds of hard work and 30 seconds rest) to really kick up the intensity. Push but don’t push too hard.

7. Not Enough Calories

Food is fuel, not the enemy. So many people make the mistake of cutting calories too low when trying to get in shape. Without adequate fuel you’ll be hard-pressed to build muscle, and it’s the muscle that raises your metabolism. Constantly under-eating creates a vicious cycle as the metabolism slows down to preserve the energy it’s not getting from food. This then stalls weight loss (or creates weight gain) which causes many people to increase cardio and cut even more calories. Determine the calories you need, taking into consideration your activity level (including exercise) and keep a food log to stay on track.

8. Too Many Cheat Meals

A dangling carrot can certainly be great motivation for your workouts but when that “carrot” becomes the occasional cinnamon roll, alcoholic beverage or seven layer chocolate cake, it’s a potential slippery slope. An indulgence for a special occasion is certainly OK and even encouraged to maintain sanity. Also, having a bite of something sinful every now and then won’t reverse all of the good you’ve done, but be cautious of a weekly cheat meal. The cleaner the fuel (food) in your body, the leaner you’ll be.

9. Stress and Hormones

At times of stress it’s not uncommon for people to turn to food whether it’s eating to fill an emotional need, or eating on the run because there never seems to be enough time in the day.  But a stressed-out lifestyle can lead to weight gain and hinder your workouts. If your workouts seem less productive and you often combat cravings, consider finding methods to reduce stress in your life.

10. Lack of Consistency

All too often people start an exercise program with the best of intentions, scheduling themselves for 5 days a week. Don’t set yourself up for failure right out of the gate. Before engaging in a regular workout routine, determine a realistic number of days that you will be able to commit to without fail. Consistency is paramount to your fitness success. Catching a workout now and then is good for your overall health but for those looking to make noticeable change, it’s going to take a regular routine and solid commitment. If you can only go 3 days a week, be sure to hit every muscle group within those 3 days with enough intensity and stay active the other days. Any amount of exercise is always encouraged, but it’s those who consider it training and not just a workout who typically achieve greater success.

(Source)

(Source: healthfitnesshumour)

2,834 notes

mrsjonie:

Rest days are critical to sports performance for a variety of reasons. Some are physiological and some are psychological. Rest is physically necessary so that the muscles can repair, rebuild and strengthen. For recreational athletes, building in rest days can help maintain a better balance between home, work and fitness goals. In the worst-case scenario, too few rest and recovery days can lead to overtraining syndrome - a difficult condition to recover from.
What Happens During Recovery?: Building recovery time into any training program is important because this is the time that the body adapts to the stress of exercise and the real training effect takes place. Recovery also allows the body to replenish energy stores and repair damaged tissues. Exercise or any other physical work causes changes in the body such as muscle tissue breakdown and the depletion of energy stores (muscle glycogen) as well as fluid loss.
Short and Long-Term Recovery: Keep in mind that there are two categories of recovery. There is immediate (short-term) recovery from a particularly intense training session or event, and there is the long-term recovery that needs to be build into a year-round training schedule. Both are important for optimal sports performance.
Short-term recovery, sometimes called active recovery occurs in the hours immediately after intense exercise. Active recovery refers to engaging in low-intensity exercise after workouts during both the cool-down phase immediately after a hard effort or workout as well as during the days following the workout. Both types of active recovery are linked to performance benefits.

Getting quality sleep is also an important part of short-term recovery. Make should to get plenty of sleep, especially if you are doing hard training. Long-term recovery techniques refer to those that are built in to a seasonal training program. Most well-designed training schedules will include recovery days and or weeks that are built into an annual training schedule. This is also the reason athletes and coaches change their training program throughout the year, add crosstraining, modify workouts types, and make changes in intensity, time, distance and all the other training variables.
Adaptation to Exercise: The Principle of Adaptation states that when we undergo the stress of physical exercise, our body adapts and becomes more efficient. It’s just like learning any new skill; at first it’s difficult, but over time it becomes second-nature. Once you adapt to a given stress, you require additional stress to continue to make progress.

Sleep Deprivation Can Hinder Sports Performance: In general, one or two nights of poor or little sleep won’t have much impact on performance, but consistently getting inadequate sleep can result in subtle changes in hormone levels, particularly those related to stress, muscle recovery and mood. While no one completely understands the complexities of sleep, some research indicates that sleep deprivation can lead to increased levels of cortisol (a stress hormone), decreased activity of human growth hormone (which is active during tissue repair), and decreased glycogen synthesis. Other studies link sleep deprivation with decreased aerobic endurance and increased ratings of perceived exertion.
Balance Exercise with Rest and Recovery: It is this alternation of adaptation and recovery that takes the athlete to a higher level of fitness. High-level athletes need to realize that the greater the training intensity and effort, the greater the need for planned recovery. Monitoring your workouts with a training log, and paying attention to how your body feels and how motivated you are is extremely helpful in determining your recovery needs and modifying your training program accordingly.

mrsjonie:

Rest days are critical to sports performance for a variety of reasons. Some are physiological and some are psychological. Rest is physically necessary so that the muscles can repair, rebuild and strengthen. For recreational athletes, building in rest days can help maintain a better balance between home, work and fitness goals. In the worst-case scenario, too few rest and recovery days can lead to overtraining syndrome - a difficult condition to recover from.

What Happens During Recovery?: Building recovery time into any training program is important because this is the time that the body adapts to the stress of exercise and the real training effect takes place. Recovery also allows the body to replenish energy stores and repair damaged tissues. Exercise or any other physical work causes changes in the body such as muscle tissue breakdown and the depletion of energy stores (muscle glycogen) as well as fluid loss.

Short and Long-Term Recovery: Keep in mind that there are two categories of recovery. There is immediate (short-term) recovery from a particularly intense training session or event, and there is the long-term recovery that needs to be build into a year-round training schedule. Both are important for optimal sports performance.

Short-term recovery, sometimes called active recovery occurs in the hours immediately after intense exercise. Active recovery refers to engaging in low-intensity exercise after workouts during both the cool-down phase immediately after a hard effort or workout as well as during the days following the workout. Both types of active recovery are linked to performance benefits.

Getting quality sleep is also an important part of short-term recovery. Make should to get plenty of sleep, especially if you are doing hard training. Long-term recovery techniques refer to those that are built in to a seasonal training program. Most well-designed training schedules will include recovery days and or weeks that are built into an annual training schedule. This is also the reason athletes and coaches change their training program throughout the year, add crosstraining, modify workouts types, and make changes in intensity, time, distance and all the other training variables.

Adaptation to Exercise: The Principle of Adaptation states that when we undergo the stress of physical exercise, our body adapts and becomes more efficient. It’s just like learning any new skill; at first it’s difficult, but over time it becomes second-nature. Once you adapt to a given stress, you require additional stress to continue to make progress.

Sleep Deprivation Can Hinder Sports Performance: In general, one or two nights of poor or little sleep won’t have much impact on performance, but consistently getting inadequate sleep can result in subtle changes in hormone levels, particularly those related to stress, muscle recovery and mood. While no one completely understands the complexities of sleep, some research indicates that sleep deprivation can lead to increased levels of cortisol (a stress hormone), decreased activity of human growth hormone (which is active during tissue repair), and decreased glycogen synthesis. Other studies link sleep deprivation with decreased aerobic endurance and increased ratings of perceived exertion.

Balance Exercise with Rest and Recovery: It is this alternation of adaptation and recovery that takes the athlete to a higher level of fitness. High-level athletes need to realize that the greater the training intensity and effort, the greater the need for planned recovery. Monitoring your workouts with a training log, and paying attention to how your body feels and how motivated you are is extremely helpful in determining your recovery needs and modifying your training program accordingly.

627 notes

kingsleyofficial:

castleforeverx:

YES.YES.YES. People need to realise this 

these are all so so important

(Source: ikantenggelem)

224,559 notes